The TOEFL iBT measures the English language skills of non-native speakers of English. Colleges and universities, as part of their admissions, require English language proficiency. It is a program focusing on effective techniques and strategies for taking the internet-based test. Including practice tests with integrated tasks in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Throughout the course, grammar, vocabulary building, idiomatic expressions and pronunciation will be emphasized with the purpose of giving students the ability to produce language pragmatically.

This course aims to:

  • Develop students’ strategic techniques for dealing with each section of the test.
  • To develop students’ test taking skills – ability to guess, work at an appropriate pace, and make decisions under pressure.
  • To develop students’ writing skills.
  • To develop students’ reading sub-skills.
  • To develop students’ listening sub-skills.
  • To develop students’ ability to use context clues to understand meaning and details.
  • To develop students’ ability to make inferences.
  • To develop students’ critical thinking/reasoning skills.
  • To develop students’ awareness of stylistic conventions of standard written English.
  • To help students practice on authentic/adapted tests.

Purpose:

Reading

  • Locate information with speed and accuracy, such as skimming the text for key facts and important information.
  • Demonstrate basic comprehension, such as understanding the main idea, key points, passage structure, passage purpose, important facts and details, vocabulary in context, and pronoun references.
  • To learn from reading, such as understanding various relationships between ideas and tracing the development of ideas throughout the passage.
  • To make inferences about an author’s opinion and what is implied in a passage.

Listening

  • To demonstrate basic comprehension, such as understanding the main idea, key points, structure, purpose, conclusion, important facts and relevant details.
  • To learn from listening, such as understanding various relationships between ideas and tracing the development of ideas or events throughout the recordings.
  • To make inferences about an author’s opinion and what is implied in the recording.

Speaking

  • Information processing – you need to be able to synthesize and summarize what you have read in your textbooks and heard in and outside of the class.
  • Viewpoint information – in some of the speaking tasks, you need to form your own opinion in response to the information you have processed.
  • Language use – your responses should demonstrate effective use of grammar and vocabulary.
  • Topic development – your responses should be sustained and sufficient for the task. They should be coherent and well developed with details and examples. A clear progression of ideas is necessary for a high score.

Writing

  • Information processing – you need to be able to synthesize and summarize what you have read in your textbooks and heard in and outside of the class.
  • Viewpoint information – you need to form your own opinion in response to the information you have processed.
  • Delivery – your essay should have a clear main idea and a good structure with well-developed ideas supported by coherent evidence. Follow he conventions of spelling, punctuation and layout.
  • Language use – your essay should demonstrate effective use of grammar and vocabulary.
  • Topic development – your essay should have the proper length, tone and conclusion.